Remember the time in your life when you knew you just had “It”?
Perhaps, you’ve got “It” right now. We’re talking about knowing you look better than ever.
Everything’s working, everything’s coming together. We asked 1,000 people to tell us about that time in their life.
Everything we learned is featured below.

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The majority of respondents say they looked their best between the ages of 18 and 25. No surprise there. Also not surprising, as age increased, people were less likely to feel they’d hit their prime. Just one percent said they looked their best at age 45 or older.

We were very curious about whether or not relationship status plays a role in any of this, and we’ll let you be the judge. Sixteen percent of people say they looked their best when they were married and 55 percent say they looked their best while in a relationship or casually dating. Twenty-two percent say they looked their best flying solo.

Most people were gainfully employed at the time they looked their best. Take a look at these statistics: 71 percent say they looked their best when they were working full-time, 25 percent say they looked their best when they were students, and 4 percent say they looked their best when they were unemployed. For those who were working, don’t think a bunch of cash went into their look either. 85 percent of respondents say they were making less than $52,000 (the median annual income in U.S.) when they looked their best.

Looking good doesn’t just happen. Most of us have to work to keep our bodies trim and healthy. In fact, 27 percent of respondents say they exercised regularly at the time they looked their best, “to look good and be healthy.” And men were twice as likely to exercise “constantly” to make their bodies look a certain way.

Three out of four participants say looking their best happened by default, meaning they weren’t actively trying to look better than ever before. A few other respondents shared the motivating factors that led them to look their best. One 39-year-old said of her 24-year-old self: “I was getting healthy in the hopes of getting pregnant.” A 45-year-old said of his 20-year-old body: “I was in the Army and forced to exercise.”

We also asked participants to share their greatest strength, when it comes to their prime look. People between the ages of 22 and 30 voted primarily for their body (42 percent), but just 16 percent expect their body to be the strength they’ll have for the longest period of time. What strength seems to stand the test of time? “Smiles” were cited more than anything else.

The best news of all? The majority of participants say their best days are ahead of them!